Origins, No.12, September 2009

I realise that we are probably already due, or even overdue, for a new Origins, the magazine for the University of New South Wales Archives, but I feel that I must make up for the hiatus of the last few months.  And even though the University no longer trains archivists, it’s good to know that they are active in the field in other ways.

The magazine looks at staff and campus development, leading off with an article by Katie Bird on Robert J. Heffron “the founding father of the University”.  As NSW Minister for Education Heffron put forward the idea of an Institute of Technology, later a University of Technology, and throughout his career, as both Minister and as Premier of the State, he worked tirelessly to support it.  Heffron was recognised by an honorary degree, and also by a building named in his honour (which is now sadly and unromantically known as the Australian School of Business Building.)  There’s also a brief overview of the archives work in 2007/2008, including their Oral History program, which is further described in the article on the facing page.

Katie returns with an article on campus development, based on a 2007 exhibition, now online at http://www.recordkeeping.unsw.edu.au.  Lots of nicely chosen black and white photos give a sense of both place and time.  Her final article, on the Monomeeth Associaton, again provides an insight into one of the pivotal characters in the University’s development, Sir Harold “Jack” Dickinson.  This article is well balanced by the preceding article by Karin Brennan on the University’s staff association and, as befits a journal about archives, their early records, which were appraised by students of the now defunct Archives Administration course in the 1980s.

Finally, there is a list of recent accessions to the archives, including a donation from Peter Orlovich, a name that will resonate with UNSW archives students, of his Invitation and menu for the Golden Jubilee Luncheon for UNSW 1957 Engineering Graduates.

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inthemailbox

Archivist, historian, avid reader

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